Alejandro Chaskielberg

  • The High Tide by Alejandro Chaskielberg

    The High Tide by Alejandro Chaskielberg

    Agonistica April 17, 2016

    With The High Tide project Chaskielberg documented the Paraná River Delta near Buenos Aires and the community of islanders who live there. The Paraná is one of the major rivers in South America, running through three countries: Brazil, Paraguay and Argentina, and supplies water for more than one hundred million people. He has lived on the islands of the Delta for two years, sharing with the islanders their daily life to get closer to the way they live and work.

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  • Alejandro Chaskielberg: Otsuchi Future Memories

    Alejandro Chaskielberg: Otsuchi Future Memories

    Lens Culture

    I portrayed the Otsuchi inhabitants in the exact spot where their houses used to be, using long-exposure night shots for which they had to stay still for several minutes. These are b&w images tinted with colors retrieved from Otsuchi´s old family photographs that were swept away by the tsunami.

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  • Life Happened Here: Tsunami Survivors Revisit Ruined Sites

    Life Happened Here: Tsunami Survivors Revisit Ruined Sites

    Jeremy Berlin, National Geographic February 10, 2016

    Alejandro Chaskielberg arrived in Otsuchi in October 2012. The Argen­tine photographer had heard about the town from a friend with relatives there, and he hoped to document the devastation. That included "moun­tains of debris" dotted with red flags where bodies had been discovered.

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  • Chaskielberg captures the past through today’s ruins

    Chaskielberg captures the past through today’s ruins

    The Times of India March 7, 2015

    Four years ago, this month, a relentless tsunami tore into the east coast of Japan triggered by a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and caused a major nuclear accident. One of the worst affected areas, due to its geographical characteristics, was Otsuchi, a fishing town in the north where a series of waves as high as 18 m destroyed 60% it.

    Greatly moved by the tragedy, Argentinean photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg visited Otsuchi a year and a half later to study the consequences of the tsunami. A Japanese curator of one of his exhibitions helped him get in touch with his relatives and the affected community. Soon Chaskielberg's project 'Otsuchi Future Memories' was born...

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  • Beautiful Portraits of Tsunami Survivors Help a Community Rebuild

    Beautiful Portraits of Tsunami Survivors Help a Community Rebuild

    Pete Brook, Wired August 18, 2014

    ONCE THE WATER’S receded, the rebuilding’s begun and the news crews have departed, how do you photograph a massive natural disaster? Alejandro Chaskielberg grappled with these questions for his series Otsuchi Future Memories, which is about the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami in Japan.

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  • THREE YEARS AFTER JAPAN’S TSUNAMI

    THREE YEARS AFTER JAPAN’S TSUNAMI

    Amber Terranova, The New Yorker March 7, 2014

    Three years ago this week, Japan was ravaged by a 9.0 earthquake, the largest on record in the country’s history. 

    The Argentine photographer Alejandro Chaskielberg visited Otsuchi earlier this year to photograph the wreckage that remains. With the help of a Japanese curator, he asked residents who had been displaced by the tsunami to pose, at night, in the ruins of their old homes. Chaskielberg told me that his extended exposures—most were several minutes long—gave the shoot a ritualistic character. “For me, there was something sacred of being in silence with the subjects in the exact point where their homes once stood,” he said.

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  • Alejandro Chaskielberg’s The High Tide

    Alejandro Chaskielberg’s The High Tide

    Alexander Ho, Time June 9, 2011

    Argentinian artist Alejandro Chaskielberg recreates everyday scenes of the Paraná River Delta Region people in surrealist photographs lit by moonlight, flashlights, strobes and lanterns.

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