Jacques Henri Lartigue

  • Six 20th-Century Photographs of the Beach to Buy Now

    Six 20th-Century Photographs of the Beach to Buy Now

    Thea Hawlin, AnOther Magazine August 14, 2017

    The Michael Hoppen Gallery’s exhibition Sandy is a glorious celebration of the seaside – and all of the photographs in it are available to purchase online

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  • MUST-DO

    MUST-DO

    Harpers Bazaar

    PICTURE-PERFECT

    In the exhibition "The Blink on an Eye", author William Boyd curates his favourite snapshots by Jacques Henri Lartigue, opeing June 8 at Michael Hoppen Gallery. 

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  • Photographer Jacques Henri Lartigue, curated by novelist William Boyd, at Michael Hoppen Gallery, London

    Photographer Jacques Henri Lartigue, curated by novelist William Boyd, at Michael Hoppen Gallery, London

    PAROMA MUKHERJEE, BLOUIN ART INFO June 29, 2016

    Novelist William Boyd recently quoted writer and critic Janet Malcolm as saying, “If you scratch a photograph you find two things: a painting and a photograph.” This is hardly ambiguous, as it reflects on photography’s long-drawn battle against fine art to be recognized as an equal, if not more.

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  • How to Spend it: Lartigue’s The Blink of An Eye photo exhibition opens

    How to Spend it: Lartigue’s The Blink of An Eye photo exhibition opens

    NICOLE SWENGLEY , FT: How to spend it June 8, 2016

    Riviera chic in photographic glory at Michael Hoppen

     

    It’s high summer along the Riviera. A lithe form in a swimsuit and turban (first picture) looks back across her shoulder at an unseen photographer. A trio of girls negotiate rocks  (third picture) as an onshore wind whips at their skirts. A slim figure in wide, white palazzo pants (second picture) gazes out to sea as she is captured from behind. You can almost feel the sunshine’s dazzle and...

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  • In pictures: the W* photography desk's daily digest of visual inspiration

    In pictures: the W* photography desk's daily digest of visual inspiration

    Wallpaper* Online June 7, 2016

    Michael Hoppen Gallery today opens its doors on ‘The Blink Of An Eye’, a new exhibition on Jacques-Henri Lartigue, as seen through the eyes of author and devoted fan William Boyd.

    Lartigue entered the world of photography early, taking his first photograph at the age of six. His family belonged to the French upper bourgeoisie, affording him a privileged childhood. His photographs are filled with visions of the sun-drenched French Riviera, fast cars and a plethora of female muses, all capturing a perfect moment in time. Lartigue himself said that, ‘I have never taken a picture for any other reason than at that moment it made me happy to do so.’

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  • Snapshots of a Life Spent Holidaying in the Sun

    Snapshots of a Life Spent Holidaying in the Sun

    Maisie Skidmore, AnOther Magazine June 6, 2016

    Jacques Henri Lartigue provides the ultimate inspiration for your vacation photography, from the beaches of Normandy to the French Riviera

     

    In Jacques Henri Lartigue’s beautiful photographs the sun is always shining, the flowers are always in full bloom, and long nails are always perfectly manicured and ready for a close-up. Whether this is a reflection of the photographer’s extraordinary capacity to inject joy into everyday situations, or simply of his implicit knowledge of how to live well (between Paris, the Biarritz and the French Riviera, preferably), is a mystery. Either way, it makes for delightful viewing.

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  • The Blink of an Eye: New exhibition explores the 'snapshot' world of Jacques-Henri Lartigue

    The Blink of an Eye: New exhibition explores the 'snapshot' world of Jacques-Henri Lartigue

    Laura Collinson, Creative Boom June 6, 2016

    The latest exhibition to open at London's Michael Hoppen Gallery explores a 'snapshot' world of Jacques-Henri Lartigue (1894-1986), as seen through the eyes of author William Boyd. Lartigue took his first photograph in 1900 at the age of six, and thanks to a privileged upbringing – his father was a banker, and the family were part of the French bourgeoisie – the photographer had access to the lives of the pre-war upper classes.

     

    The show will feature some of Lartigue's best-loved work, with many of the photographs portraying his muses, Bibi, Rene Perle and Chou Valton, as well as his wife, Florette.

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  • A Shot in the Dark

    A Shot in the Dark

    Claire Holland, FT online & Weekend paper June 3, 2016

    What inspires a novelist to co-curate a show on Jacques Henri lartigue? William Boyd talks snapshots and stories with Claire Holland.

     

    Jacques Henri Lartigue took photographs for almost five decades but he thought of himself primarily as a painter until, at the age of 69, his reputation as a photographer was established by a show at MoMA in New York in 1963.

     

    Lartigue was given a camera at the age of seven. Although he never saw it as a toy, the process of making pictures held for him an essential element of play from the outset. He became renowned for his dynamic black-and-white photographs of car races, aeroplanes, people and animals in motion and vivacious snapshots of friends and family — a portrait of turn-of-the-century France as it appeared to a fun-loving boy. Later, as a teenager, he went on to capture with the same humour the elegant ladies parading on Paris’s Avenue de Bois and at the racetrack. For Lartigue, the snapshot became a perfect medium to capture the fun and excitement of his daily life.

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  • J.H.Lartigue: Snap Judgement

    J.H.Lartigue: Snap Judgement

    William Boyd, The Guardian May 28, 2016

    A photographer who happend to capture the spirit of early 20th century France or a visionary who turned the form into art? William Boyd asseses the work of Jacques Henri Lartigue.

     

     

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  • Snap judgment: how photographer Jacques Henri Lartigue captured the moment

    Snap judgment: how photographer Jacques Henri Lartigue captured the moment

    William Boyd, The Guardian May 27, 2016

    Sometimes institutions can change the history of art. Often by exclusion – one thinks of the Salon des Refusés in Paris in 1863 and how it marked the beginning of the end of Beaux Arts classicism and signalled the birth of impressionism. A prevailing taste is suddenly seen as outmoded or moribund and culture decides to take a 180-degree swerve. Or, alternatively, institutions bring about change by giving the imprimatur of acceptance. TheSensation show at the Royal Academy, London, in 1997, for example, legitimised and enshrined the raw iconoclasm and entrepreneurialism of the Young British Artists...

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  • Jacques-Henri Lartigue: The Blink of an Eye

    Jacques-Henri Lartigue: The Blink of an Eye

    Paris Photo May 23, 2016

    The Michael Hoppen Gallery is delighted to announce a new show exploring the 'snapshot' world of Jacques-Henri Lartigue (1894-1986), as seen through the eyes of author William Boyd - a life long devotee of Lartigue's luminous views on life. Lartigue took his first photograph in 1900 at the age of six. Born into privilege, Lartigue's father was a banker, and the family belonged to the upper French bourgeoisie. Lartigue transfixed the delightful life of the pre-war upper classes with his fleeting visions and a passionate devotion to the pursuit of joy.

     

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  • Lartigue: Life in Colour

    Lartigue: Life in Colour

    Hinde Haest, Aperture February 3, 2016

    Renowned for his vivacious snapshots of friends and family, a new exhibition in Amsterdam showcases the early color photographs of a bon vivant.

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  • Jacques Henri Lartigue: When Black and White Master First Sees Red

    Jacques Henri Lartigue: When Black and White Master First Sees Red

    Lucy Davies, The Telegraph February 2, 2016

    It was 1901, the height of the Belle Époque. Lartigue came from a prosperous background, and the black and white pictures he took in and around his home in Courbevoie, near Paris, were full  of go-carting, tennis and bobsledding. As he grew older, this life of leisure came to encompass skiing in Chamonix and picnicking on the sands of the Côte d'Azur.

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  • Michael Hoppen opens his vault of photographic treasures

    Michael Hoppen opens his vault of photographic treasures

    Sean O'Hagan, The Guardian December 6, 2012

    The Michael Hoppen Gallery in Chelsea is 20 years old. To mark the occasion, its owner has curated a show called Finders Keepers, dedicated to his own personal collection of photographs - the ones he "has liked and been able to keep", rather than sold. The exhibition and the accompanying catalogue is an illuminating glimpse into the mind of a photographer who became a curator and an obsessive collector. It contains work by the famous -ArakiAvedonLartigue - and the lesser-known, as well as several found images by anonymous photographers.

     

     

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  • ART/ACHITECTURE; Lartigue's Albums: The Well-Lensed Life

    ART/ACHITECTURE; Lartigue's Albums: The Well-Lensed Life

    Alan Riding, The New York Times July 6, 2003

    For a career, Jacques-Henri Lartigue chose painting. For amusement, he chose photography. So it is quite by accident that 17 years after his death, this slim, dapper Frenchman is remembered as one of the 20th century's most original photographers while meriting little more than a footnote in the history of modern painting.

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  • If it moves, shoot it

    If it moves, shoot it

    Gaby Wood, The Guardian December 24, 2000

    Lartigue was born in Paris at the end of the nineteenth century into a wealthy, high-society family with a few eccentrics in its midst. His father was a banker and keen amateur photographer. His grandfather was one of the inventors of the monorail system, and his elder brother designed and built aeroplanes as early as 1908. In his twenties, Lartigue married Bibi, the daughter of André Messager, a composer, conductor and manager of the Paris Opera.

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