Sammy Slabbinck: ONLINE

1 Dec 2015 - 9 Jan 2016
  • A Belgian Artist’s Collages Come to Life and Trick the Eye

    A Belgian Artist’s Collages Come to Life and Trick the Eye

    The New Yorker December 14, 2015

    The Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck started making found-photo collages in 2009 using vintage ads and images culled from old copies of magazines like Paris Match.

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  • How Copy + Paste Got Cool

    How Copy + Paste Got Cool

    Anna Jay, Refinery29 December 4, 2015

    Collage art is making a major comeback. Forget Neil Buchanan with his PVA (clearly you already have), a new wave of artists are using mid-century magazine pages to make mind-bending works of art. 

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  • Sammy Slabbinck: Fantastic collages made from mid-century issues of Paris Match and Playboy

    Sammy Slabbinck: Fantastic collages made from mid-century issues of Paris Match and Playboy

    Alex Hawkins, It's Nice that December 2, 2015

    Since closing his modern art gallery in 2009, Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck has been using his extensive collection of mid-century magazines to create surreal collages.

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  • Sammy Slabbinck: a modern Magritte

    Sammy Slabbinck: a modern Magritte

    Lucy Davies, Telephoto online November 30, 2015

    Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck raids old copies of Paris Match to make works that tease - and terrify.

     

    Sammy Slabbinck began buying midcentury magazines in his teens. It was the early Nineties and every weekend he would scour the flea market in his home town of Bruges.

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  • Sammy Slabbinck: If Magritte had read womens magazines...

    Sammy Slabbinck: If Magritte had read womens magazines...

    Lucy Davies, The Telegraph November 28, 2015

    Sammy Slabbinck began buying midcentury magazines in his teens. It was the early nineties and every weekend he would scour the the flea market in his home town of Bruges. When the economic crisis hit in 2009, he lost his job and began to experiment with the paper hoard he'd amassed over the previous decades, slicing the images from their original contexts into something wittier and more vital.

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