? The image as question

28 Sep - 26 Nov 2016
  • Sean O'Hagan's top 10 photography exhibitions of 2016

    Sean O'Hagan's top 10 photography exhibitions of 2016

    Sean O'Hagan, The Guardian December 7, 2016

    5. Eamonn Doyle: END.

    The most-talked about show at the Arles photography festival was this radically staged installation, which presented Doyle’s vivid Dublin street portraits in a maze-like room... READ MORE

     

    8. The Image As Question

    An exhibition that explored the photograph as proof at a time when the uses of photography in art and on social media directly challenge or subvert that suddenly old-fashioned notion. Michael Hoppen, a passionate believer in photography as an art form... READ MORE

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  • Top 10 Photobooks of 2016

    Top 10 Photobooks of 2016

    Tim Clark, 1000 words mag December 5, 2016

    Selected by Tim Clark.

    An annual tribute to the most exceptional photobook releases from the year that was – selected by our Editor in Chief.

     

    This richly illustrated, cleverly designed book offers a small but brilliant insight into the collection of reknown photography dealer Michael Hoppen. The book empties images of their original evidential function and reconceptualises them in a new context and in a new time. Questioning what a ‘fact’ is a well-trodden area of investigation yet the presentation, editing, sequence and paper choices are very well-measured and all equally important to the publication as various parts separately. Rewards the curious.

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  • In praise of the lesser- known photographer

    In praise of the lesser- known photographer

    CRISTINA RUIZ, Art Newspaper November 16, 2016

    The London-based dealer Michael Hoppen has been collecting photographs documenting crime scenes, zoological specimens and scientific explorations for more than a decade. “I saw a wonderful show about eugenics, The Beautiful and the Damned, curated by Roger Hargreaves at the National Portrait Gallery many years ago,” he says. “I suddenly realised there was an area of photography that I hadn’t really considered before and it was science. When a photographer is documenting a crime scene or a science project, the compositional side of images, aesthetic considerations, all of that gets turned on its head. That is interesting.”

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  • The Image as Question: An Exhibition of Evidential Photography

    The Image as Question: An Exhibition of Evidential Photography

    Will Britten, Film's Not Dead November 9, 2016

    The Image as Question: An Exhibition of Evidential photography is a visual theatre of post-documentary and artistic passion...

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  • The Image as Question At Michael Hoppen Gallery

    The Image as Question At Michael Hoppen Gallery

    L'OEIL DE LA PHOTOGRAPHIE October 13, 2016

    Part of the fascination with all photography is that the medium is firmly grounded in the documentary tradition. It has been used as a record of crime scenes, zoological specimens, lunar and space exploration, phrenology, fashion and importantly, art and science. It has been used as ‘proof’ of simple things such as family holidays and equally of atrocities taking place on the global stage. Any contemporary artist using photography has to accept the evidential language embedded in the medium.

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  • EVIDENCE

    EVIDENCE

    Michael Hoppen, Hunger Magazine, Issue #11 October 10, 2016

    "I HAVE NO MORBID CURIOSITY FOR CRIME SCENES OF DEATH AND DESTRUCTION, BUT I AM, BY NATURE, AN INQUISITIVE SORT..."

     
    Love life and death have always preoccupied me, and I have always had the propensity to be fascinated by things I know very little about. Crime-solving is a field that benefits hugely from photography, but it was not simply tis paradigm that I found interesting. Very rarely does a crime photographer try to create a 'beautiful' or 'well composed' image. He or she is there to record a scene, individual or object, and to create what is hopefully useful or empirical evidence that will then be used to solve the crime, or identify an individual. It is this disregard for the basic structures and processes of aesthetics that I found absorbing."
  • Evidence Case file. The image as question: an exploration of evidential photography

    Evidence Case file. The image as question: an exploration of evidential photography

    Photobooks, Blog, Gabriela Cendoya October 8, 2016

    The issue is amazing, and the mixture works is wonderful. Alfredo Jaar, Simon Norfolk, Ernst Haas, Enrique Metinides, Valery Khristoforov... The list is only part of the exhibition.

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  • Crime! Sex! Space! A Showcase of Evidential Photography

    Crime! Sex! Space! A Showcase of Evidential Photography

    Hattie Crisell, AnOther Magazine September 29, 2016

    Hattie Crisell talks to Michael Hoppen about his intriguing new exhibition, comprising photos which document debauchery, science experiments, planetary maps and more

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  • Arts picks of the week: 26th September-2nd October

    Arts picks of the week: 26th September-2nd October

    Evening Standard September 29, 2016

    The Image as Question, Michael Hoppen Gallery

     

    Photographs can be proof that something happened - there’s no getting away from that haircut you had when you were in year 10, for example, because there’s the snaps to prove it. The latest exhibition at the Michael Hopper Gallery takes photographs used for evidence, or as proof of something, and dislocates them from their context so as to turn the question back on the viewer. 

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  • Seeing is believing: documentary photography from Francis Bacon to 9/11

    Seeing is believing: documentary photography from Francis Bacon to 9/11

    Sean O' Hagen, The Guardian September 28, 2016

    There is a quiet power to Simon Norfolk’s black-and-white study of what looks like an ordinary staircase in a nondescript house. What strikes you first in this photograph – which features in a new exhibition called ? The Image as Question – is how the light plays on each polished surface: the gleaming handrail and pristine skirting board, the gloss-painted wall. It is then you notice that the surface of each stair is not straight but gently curving, worn by the footsteps of those who have walked down them over the years.

     

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  • Proof Reading: Tracing the history of evidential photography

    Proof Reading: Tracing the history of evidential photography

    Charlotte Harding, British Journal of Photography September 26, 2016

    The Image as Question, the new exhibition opening at the Michael Hoppen Gallery this week, brings together some of the greatest image-makers of modern times.

     

    What do photographs of 9/11, burnt filing cabinets and a police line-up all have in common?

     

    They are all compelling records that uncover revealing evidence.

     

    Since it’s invention, photography’s claims of truth and scientific objectivity have long furnished the photograph as the primary tool of evidence.

     

    From crime scenes, zoological specimens, lunar and space exploration, to family holidays and  atrocities taking place on the global stage, the photograph has been used as ‘proof’. Any contemporary artist using photography has to accept the evidential language embedded in the medium.

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  • Compelling evidence: crime scene photographs

    Compelling evidence: crime scene photographs

    Liz Jobey, FT Online September 9, 2016

    From an album of tattooed criminals to the burnt-out filing cabinets of Iraq, a new exhibition shows how images originally taken to provide visual proof have emerged as works of art

     

    "I go out buying photographs every day, whether it’s in a flea market or a gallery,” Michael Hoppen said cheerfully, when asked about the provenance of some of the more arcane pieces in his collection. “I have these mental boxes sitting there waiting for things to be dropped into them.” Over the years, these have included the entire collection of boxers and prizefighters that once lined the walls of the French House in Soho, where Francis Bacon and Jeffrey Bernard used to drink; a tiny anonymous 19th-century albumen print of a voluptuous nude, her curves sculpted by the play of light, made as an artist’s study; a slightly cloudy autochrome — an early colour process — showing a group of chefs gathered around a table for lunch, which looks like a still from a French film.

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