Kishin Shinoyama

  • Surprisingly familiar photography

    Surprisingly familiar photography

    Stuart Munro, The Japan Times December 6, 2012

    How do you continually surprise and shock when your work has become so familiar? What can you say with a photograph that hasn’t been said before? Will making things bigger make them better? These questions niggle at the back of the mind while visiting Shinoyama Kishin’s current show. “The people by Kishin” at Tokyo Opera City Gallery is one person’s constantly re-adjusting view of Japan that succeeds in being as confounding as it is at times unexpected.

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  • After the Storm: Post-Tsunami Japan by Kishin Shinoyama

    After the Storm: Post-Tsunami Japan by Kishin Shinoyama

    Bryan Walsh, Time November 21, 2011

    Within weeks of the Japan tsunami this March, Tokyo-born photographer Kishin Shinoyama brought his camera to the scene and captured a land ripped apart.

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  • KISHIN SHINOYAMA JUST WASN'T MADE FOR THESE TIMES

    KISHIN SHINOYAMA JUST WASN'T MADE FOR THESE TIMES

    Vice August 10, 2010

    As we were trying to calm ourselves in front of Kishin Shinoyama's office before this interview, a taxi pulled over and out stumbled the man himself. The sight of him staggering up the stairs made us remember that he was made of flesh and bones. It's easy to forget that. The soon-to-be 70 year old is one of the super-heavyweights of the Japanese photography world. Not a day goes by without one of his photographs showing up on the cover of magazines, books, and posters everywhere. He shoots anything from antiques to porn stars. In his career many of his books have reached the scale of full-on social phenomena, and have entangled him in cultural problems way bigger than himself.

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  • Births and Rebirths

    Births and Rebirths

    Nowness January 3, 2010

    In the 1960s photographer Kishin Shinoyama was the Japanese equivalent of David Bailey—a media star known for his iconic images of the celebrities of the time. Born in Tokyo in 1940, at the age of three Shinoyama underwent ordination rites to be a Buddhist priest. At the age of 10 he was given his first camera and was so taken with it he built his own working darkroom. His exhibitions Birth (1968) and Nude (1970) soon established his unique, fluid and daring approach to photography.

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