Juana Gómez

  • Juana Gómez's embroidered family photos – in pictures

    Juana Gómez's embroidered family photos – in pictures

    The Guardian, online December 5, 2017

    Chilean artist Juana Gómez uses weaving and embroidery to explore themes of genealogy, mythology and biology in her own female lineage


    Juana Gómez: Distaff is at Michael Hoppen Gallery, London, until 22 December

     

     

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  • Juana Gomez at Michael Hoppen Gallery: Celebrating the female body with photography and embroidery

    Juana Gomez at Michael Hoppen Gallery: Celebrating the female body with photography and embroidery

    JESSIE THOMPSON, Evening Standard October 30, 2017

    Gomez takes photographs herself and other women in her family, including her mother and daughter, and then prints them over a canvas and embroiders anatomy over them. The works have always completely sold out when they have previously been shown.

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  • Juana Gómez Combines Physics, Anatomy and Art in Delicately Embroidered Self-Portraits.

    Juana Gómez Combines Physics, Anatomy and Art in Delicately Embroidered Self-Portraits.

    Jesse Raubenheimer, The Art of Medicine October 27, 2017

    In her series of works known as ‘Constructal.’, Chilean artist Juana Gómez explores the relationship between the human body and the environment.

     

    The portraits are inspired by Physicist Adrian Bejan’s constructal law of nature, which proposes that recurring designs arise in all living systems, and that these designs have a universal tendency to evolve in a certain direction over time.

     

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  • Juana Gómez: WSJ

    Juana Gómez: WSJ

    Wall Street Journal October 23, 2017

    Chilean artist Juana Gómez’s hand embroidered photographic canvases combine the spheres of scientific exploration with ancestral tradition. Weaving complex scientific and mythological patterns onto images of both her own and her daughters’ bodies, her work is interested in placing mankind within a broader context of interconnectivity. Rather than seeing us as individuals, detatched from one another and the world around us, Gómez positions us as part of an ancient chain that goes back to the origin of life: a combination of patterns, molecules and small organisms.

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