Brassaï

  • Brassaï (1899-1984)

    Brassaï (1899-1984)

    Jessica Vaillat, The Red List

    Having adopted the name Brassai (inspired by his native town), he began to photograph Paris by night in the early thirties and thus depicted with humour and tenderness a crude collection of prostitutes, travesties, louts and lovers passionately kissing under the dim light of street lamps.

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  • The Facts of Brassaï

    The Facts of Brassaï

    Marta Represa, AnOther April 15, 2014

    We present our favourite facts about Brassaï, the photographer who captured the truth as well as forging the myth of Parisian bohemia

     

    The steps of Montmartre in the morning fog, a couple kissing in a café with glasses of Chablis sitting before them, the Eiffel Tower lit up against a midnight sky. Brassaï – along with a handful of early 20th century photographers such as Henri Cartier-Bresson and Eugène Atget – was key in creating the myth of Paris as a bohemian metropolis where artists mix with prostitutes, pimps, philosophers and socialites.

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  • Brassaï in Paris: A Photographer’s Love Letter to the City of Light

    Brassaï in Paris: A Photographer’s Love Letter to the City of Light

    Liz Ronk, Time March 27, 2014

    It’s unlikely that any single artist has ever been — or ever will be — as intimately associated with Paris as the Hungarian-born photographer, writer and filmmaker Gyula Halász, known to the world as Brassaï. Through his gorgeous black-and-white portraits of Parisians in cafes, gardens and dance halls, Brassaï defined, and continues to define, an ideal of the City of Light that has lasted for generations. Countless people around the globe — when they think of the Paris of the 1930s and 1940s — envision the great, ancient city as Brassaï captured it through his artful lens.

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  • Eyewitness: Hungarian Photography in the Twentieth Century, Royal Academy

    Eyewitness: Hungarian Photography in the Twentieth Century, Royal Academy

    Francis Hodgson, The Financial Times July 19, 2011

    Much Hungarian photography is marvellous, and the Royal Academy, more than 20 years after its last photographic show, has engaged Colin Ford, one of the few world-class photohistorians in the UK, to act as the lead curator.

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  • Where there's muck, there's Brassaï

    Where there's muck, there's Brassaï

    Peter Conrad, The Guardian February 25, 2001

    As a chronicler of brothels, transvestite dance halls and urinals, Brassaï was a photographer without peer

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