Daido Moriyama

"WE PERCEIVE COUNTLESS IMAGES ALL DAY LONG AND DO NOT ALWAYS FOCUS ON THEM. SOMETIMES THEY ARE BLURRY, OR FLEETING, OR JUST GLIMPSED OUT OF THE CORNER OF THE EYE. THE CRUSHING FORCE OF TIME IS BEFORE MY EYES, AND I TRY TO KEEP PRESSING THE SHUTTER RELEASE OF THE CAMERA."

- Daido Moriyama

Daido Moriyama (b.1938, Osaka) is one of Japan's leading figures in photography. Witness to the spectacular changes that transformed post WWII Japan, his black and white photographs express a fascination with the cultural contradictions of age-old traditions that persist within modern society. Providing a harsh, crude vision of city life and the chaos of everyday existence, strange worlds, and unusual characters, his work occupies a unique space between the objective and the subjective, the illusory and the real. 

 

 

First trained in graphic design before taking up photography with Takeji Iwaniya, Moriyama moved to Tokyo in 1961 where he assisted photographer Eikoh Hosoe for three years and became familiar with the trenchant social critiques produced by photographer Shomei Tomatsu. He also drew inspiration from William Klein’s confrontational photographs of New York, Andy Warhol’s silkscreened multiples of newspaper images, and the writings of Jack Kerouac and Yukio Mishima. 

 

Moriyama’s work has been collected by numerous prominent public and private collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Getty Museum, Los Angeles, The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and The Centre Pompidou, Paris. Moriyama has had major solo shows at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Fondation Cartier pour l'Art Contemporain, Paris, The Fotomuseum, Winterthur, Switzerland, The Folkwang, Essen, Germany, The Metropolitan Museum of Photography in Tokyo and the Tate Modern in London.