Dr Harold Edgerton

  • The Image as Question: An Exhibition of Evidential Photography

    The Image as Question: An Exhibition of Evidential Photography

    Will Britten, Film's Not Dead November 9, 2016

    The Image as Question: An Exhibition of Evidential photography is a visual theatre of post-documentary and artistic passion...

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  • Crime! Sex! Space! A Showcase of Evidential Photography

    Crime! Sex! Space! A Showcase of Evidential Photography

    Hattie Crisell, AnOther Magazine September 29, 2016

    Hattie Crisell talks to Michael Hoppen about his intriguing new exhibition, comprising photos which document debauchery, science experiments, planetary maps and more

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  • Seeing is believing: documentary photography from Francis Bacon to 9/11

    Seeing is believing: documentary photography from Francis Bacon to 9/11

    Sean O' Hagen, The Guardian September 28, 2016

    There is a quiet power to Simon Norfolk’s black-and-white study of what looks like an ordinary staircase in a nondescript house. What strikes you first in this photograph – which features in a new exhibition called ? The Image as Question – is how the light plays on each polished surface: the gleaming handrail and pristine skirting board, the gloss-painted wall. It is then you notice that the surface of each stair is not straight but gently curving, worn by the footsteps of those who have walked down them over the years.

     

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  • Dr Flash

    Dr Flash

    George Upton, Avaunt Magazine July 14, 2016

    An engineer and an artist, Dr Harold Egerton’s high-speed photography revealed a world hidden in plain sight. Here, Avaunt looks at the inventive genius of the man known as Dr Flash.

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  • Harold Edgerton: The Man Who Froze Time

    Harold Edgerton: The Man Who Froze Time

    Stephen Dowling, BBC July 23, 2014

    Every time you use the flash on your smartphone or camera, you should give silent praise to Harold Eugene Edgerton. In the era of vacuum tubes and radios the size of tables, Edgerton created a way to stop the world; a bullet passing through an apple; a footballer's boot connecting with a ball; the crown-like splash created from a single drop of milk. He was the first man to harness electricity to freeze time to an instant.

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  • Dr. Strobe: the man who stopped time and electrified photography - in pictures

    Dr. Strobe: the man who stopped time and electrified photography - in pictures

    Mee-Lai Stone, The Guardian June 12, 2014

    If you could stop time, here is what you might see: a bullet being shot through an apple, an egg being cracked into a fan, or a play-by-play of Pancho Gonzales's famous serve. MIT professor Harold Edgerton invented the strobe flash in the 1930s – and his stroboscopic photography captured amazing moments that would otherwise be missed in the blink of an eye...

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  • Dr. Harold Edgerton, Michael Hoppen Gallery, London

    Dr. Harold Edgerton, Michael Hoppen Gallery, London

    Aesthetica Magazine June 2, 2014

    The inventive and intelligent mind of Dr. Harold Edgerton is responsible for some of the world’s most pioneering photographic devices and techniques. 

    His work has been exhibited across the world and his prints are held in museum collections worldwide. The exhibition at Michael Hoppen Gallery presents a rare selection of vintage black and white prints from his estate.

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  • Nebraskan-born engineer Dr Harold Edgerton photographed motion that was too fast to be captured with tradition

    Nebraskan-born engineer Dr Harold Edgerton photographed motion that was too fast to be captured with tradition

    Gillian Orr, Independent May 31, 2014

    Dr Harold Edgerton led the sort of life that lends itself to a Hollywood biopic. During his illustrious career the MIT professor, who died in 1990 at the age of 86, made advances in night aerial photography that was used during the Second World War, photographed nuclear testing in the 1950s and 1960s, and used radar to help illuminate the ocean floors for Jacques Cousteau.

    But it is probably the electronic stroboscope for which he is most remembered. This pioneering work allowed the Nebraskan-born engineer to photograph the previously unseen: motion that was too fast to be captured with traditional photography.

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