Neil Libbert

  • The big picture: New Yorkers ice-skate into the 1960s

    The big picture: New Yorkers ice-skate into the 1960s

    Tim Adams, The Guardian, Online December 9, 2018

    Neil Libbert, who has worked for the Observer and the Guardian for nearly 60 years, took this photograph of ice-skaters in Central Park in December 1960. It appeared on the front page of the Guardianon the last day of that month, referencing a long cold snap in New York City that ran beyond John F Kennedy’s inauguration the following January.

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  • The Photojournalist Using His Camera to Level the Score

    The Photojournalist Using His Camera to Level the Score

    Emily Gosling, AnOther Magazine June 22, 2017

    Over his 60 years in photographic reportage, Neil Libbert has turned his lens to the good, the bad and the unfair, a new exhibition demonstrates.

     

    Over his almost 60-year career photographer Neil Libbert has shot everything from the Brixton Riots to George Best, a young Helen Mirren, the folk working at a DHSS Benefit Office, and children playing on the streets of Harlem in the 1960s. Whatever his subject and whenever it was shot, Libbert’s knack for capturing those tiny moments that tell a thousand stories make each photograph as brilliant and revelatory as the next.

     

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  • Neil Libbert at Michael Hoppen Gallery, London

    Neil Libbert at Michael Hoppen Gallery, London

    L'Oeil de la Photographie June 9, 2017

    Photo of the day

     

     

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  • Flat caps and bowler hats: Neil Libbert's bygone Britain

    Flat caps and bowler hats: Neil Libbert's bygone Britain

    The Guardian June 9, 2017

    For six decades, the celebrated Guardian photojournalist has chronicled everyday British life. Here, he trains his lens on postwar austerity – and flying cats

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  • Neil Libbert at Michael Hoppen Gallery

    Neil Libbert at Michael Hoppen Gallery

    Monovisions June 8, 2017

    Libbert has been working as a street photographer and photojournalist for nearly 60 years and the exhibition will focus on key works made during his earlier career. This will be the first recent opportunity to explore the full range of Libbert’s talents and will include a number of previously unseen prints such as West Indian Arrivals, Waterloo Station, 1961 or Outside the Black-E Arts Centre, Liverpool, 1973...

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  • PROLIFIC PHOTO JOURNALIST NEIL LIBBERT OPENS NEW EXHIBITION

    PROLIFIC PHOTO JOURNALIST NEIL LIBBERT OPENS NEW EXHIBITION

    Juxtapoz June 1, 2017

    Neil Libbert has been working as a street photographer and photojournalist for nearly 60 years and his upcoming exhbition at Michael Hoppen Gallery will focus on key works made during his earlier career.

     

     
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  • ON SHOW: Neil Libbert @ Uri Gallery & Museum

    ON SHOW: Neil Libbert @ Uri Gallery & Museum

    Anna Bonita Evans, Black + White Photography magazine July 6, 2016

    "Foreigners see things that natives don't" says Wolfgang Suschitzky

     

    While Suschitzky's and Bohm's work are widely known, Neil Libbert's work is less so. The youngest of three at 78 years old, Libbert studied as a photographer and opened his own studio in 1957. He first visited New York in teh early 60s wile working for the Sunday Times and New York Times, where he went, with camera in hand to the Upper East Side tot he ghetto's of Harlem. It was during that period that he documented the 1964 race riots. Photographing at close quarters and with an unbiased point of view, his work holds the sensibility of a poet but the curiosity of a reporter.

     

    Show runs until 27 August at London's Uri Gallery & museum

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  • Unseen London, Paris, New York, 1930s-60s

    Unseen London, Paris, New York, 1930s-60s

    Tom Seymour, BJP - British Journal of Photography May 24, 2016

    The photographs of three major twentieth-century photographers - Wolfgang Suschitzky, Dorothy Bohm and Neil Libbert - of three great world cities across three crucial decades.

     

    Neil Libbert was born in Salford in 1938. His career as a photo-journalist that brought him to London by 1961, where he worked for The Observer, The Sunday Times and New York Times. The selected images focus on his first visits to New York in the early 1960s, where he photographed across all social divides – from the affluent Upper East Side to the Harlem streets, capturing the 1964 race riots at close quarters.

     

    Libbert’s work reflects the contrasts and tensions that he encountered, and his images of Harlem provide the viewer with a rare, unbiased view of this troubled area. Libbert’s work has been little exhibited and his New York images are some of his strongest.

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  • The New York School

    The New York School

    The Guardian April 17, 2008

    Between the late 1930s and the early 1960s a group of young photographers living and working in New York City redefined street photography. This group of artists became known as The New York School. A new exhibition at the Michael Hoppen Gallery in London (until June 7 2008) brings together the work of these photographers as they documented the post-war energy of the city in their trademark black-and-white, film noir style. Step in for a look.

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  • Neil Libbert: World Press Photo award winner

    Neil Libbert: World Press Photo award winner

    World Press Photo March 15, 2000

    Early in the evening a nail bomb exploded in The Admiral Duncan gay pub in Soho. Three people died and up to 70 were injured. It was the third such bombing in less than two weeks. Earlier bombs had gone off in predominantly black and Bengali areas of the city. Police arrested and charged a 22-year-old man early on May 1. They reported that the bomber was acting alone, and was not affiliated to any of the extremist right-wing groups that had claimed responsibility for the bombings. Later, the man admitted causing the explosions.

     

    Commissioned by

    Network Photographers

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